You feel lost, trying to deploy your Common Lisp web application to the cloud. Where do you even start? It seems easier to stick with a more popular language. The shackles of the managed platform isn’t nearly as bad as an undeployable app.

You know Common Lisp web applications can run in the cloud… you just don’t know how all the pieces fit together.

But what if you did? What if you knew exactly how to make your web app live and had an easy workflow for deploying updates? You could switch all your web development to Common Lisp - forever.

It’s true, deploying web applications from first principles involve lots of moving parts but it is easy if you know how to fit them together.

Learn how to deploy Common Lisp web applications to your own server with my ebook, Deploying Common Lisp web applications. It gives clear and detailed steps to:

  • Ensure basic server security,
  • Set up a free, auto-renewing SSL certificate,
  • Configure Nginx to serve you application via HTTPS,
  • Configure Systemd to ensure your app is started at boot and restarted after crashes,
  • Run database migrations, and
  • Quickly and easily deploy application updates.

The guide uses my Feather web application template to get your app live in the shortest possible time but you can apply the information to any other web framework once you get the hang of it.

You’ll learn all the steps necessary to deploy Common Lisp web applications to a cloud based server. Just pick your domain name and buy Deploying Common Lisp web applications. Your first app will be live by the end of chapter one.

Switch to Common Lisp for web development.

Sign up now and get 10% discount when the book launches.

What’s inside?

Chapter 1 is a step-by-step guide for setting up and configuring an Ubuntu server to serve Common Lisp web applications on the Internet. That includes basic server security, encrypting all web traffic, restarting the app on failure, setting up a database and running migrations, and a frictionless deployment workflow.

Chapters two and three discuss the various components of the stack in more detail.

The rest of the book is an anthology of the blog posts in the “Picking libraries for web development” series.